Cal Cybersecurity Research Fellows

Since 2019 CLTC has provided a Cal Cybersecurity Research Fellowship, made possible through the generous support of a Cal alumnus. The outsized results of these awards on both student recipients and research outcomes inspired CLTC to formalize a Cal Cybersecurity Research Fellowship Fund, inviting the broader community to directly support talented students like those profiled below: 2022 honorees Emma Lurie and Conor Gilsenan; 2021 honorees Tanu Kaushik and Ji Su Yoo; 2020 honoree Nathan Malkin; and the inaugural 2019 honoree, Matt Olfat.  

Team Kohana

2022-23 Fellows, UC Berkeley School of Information 

Kohana is a distributed deception technology focused on protecting cloud assets through adversary engagement. It is designed to help customers operationalize their MITRE Engage™ playbooks, operating with the adversary engagement premise that the adversary only needs to be wrong once for us to detect and deny cyber threats.

Emma Lurie

Emma Lurie

2022 Fellow, UC Berkeley School of Information 

How policy choices of platforms and government agencies shape the online election information infrastructure, and how related misinformation is linked to voter disenfranchisement — particularly among marginalized communities that already have historical distrust in the election process.

Conor Gilsenan

2022 Fellow, UC Berkeley Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

Improving usability and account recovery mechanisms in adoption and acceptance of multi-factor authentication.

Tanu Kaushik

2021 Fellow, UC Berkeley School of Information

Understanding threats posed by adversarial machine learning and the detection, protection, response, and recovery mechanisms for known attack techniques.

Ji Su Yoo

2021 Fellow, UC Berkeley School of Information

How the message and identity of the messenger impacts reception of misinformation corrections.

Nathan Malkin

2020 Fellow, UC Berkeley Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

Making the Internet of Things technology more private — and privacy controls more equitable — for marginalized groups.

Matt Olfat

2019 Fellow, UC Berkeley Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research

Detecting attacks on cyber-physical systems interacting with 5G.