December 12, 2017

Amit Elazari, Kurt Hepler, Won Park Chosen to Represent CLTC as RSAC Security Scholars

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News

We are pleased to announce that Amit Elazari, a doctoral law candidate (J.S.D.) at UC Berkeley School of Law and a CTSP Fellow at Berkeley School of Information; Kurt Hepler, a student in the School of Information’s MIMS program; and Won Park have been chosen to represent CLTC as RSA Conference Security Scholars at the RSA Conference 2018, which will run from April 16-20, 2018 at the Moscone Center & Marriott in San Francisco. As RSAC Security Scholars, these researchers will have opportunities to network with leading experts, attend keynote presentations, showcase their work, and more. We interviewed Amit, Kurt, and Won to hear their thoughts about this opportunity.

Amit Elazari

Amit Elazari is a doctoral law candidate at Berkeley Law and a Research Fellow at CTSP, Berkeley School of Information. She graduated summa cum laude from her LL.M. in IDC, Israel following the submission of a research thesis in the field of intellectual property law and standard-form contracts. She holds an LL.B. and a B.A. in Business Administration (summa cum laude) from IDC, is admitted to practice law in Israel and has worked at one of Israel’s leading law firms, GKH Law and in the private sector. Amit has been engaged in extensive academic work, including research, teaching, and editorial positions. Her work has been presented in leading security and Intellectual Property conferences such as IPSC 2017, Internet Law Work-in-Progress conference, Defcon and BsidesLV. At Berkeley Amit also serves as a submission editor for Berkeley Technology Law Journal, a GSI at the Legal Studies department and as research assistant to professors Menell, Mulligan and Bamberger.

Why did you apply to be an RSAC Scholar?

I believe that legal scholars must engage directly with this industry to learn about the challenges cybersecurity is presenting and how to confront them. To construct better cyber laws and genuine safe harbors for security research, legal professionals and policy thinkers must take part in an interdisciplinary dialogue with the different stakeholders in this industry to truly understand its needs: RSAC Security Scholars program is the best place to do just that.

Last summer I conducted the first-ever comprehensive legal research on bug bounties. I shared my research, alongside proposed policy recommendations in a series of security conferences, including Defcon. It felt great to try to spark a reform by engaging directly with this industry, and it allowed me to connect with the people that can actually push towards reform.

What are your primary research interests?

Law (Intellectual Property, Privacy, and Computer Crime Law)

What do you think are some of the most important emerging areas in cybersecurity?

From a legal standpoint: “the law of vulnerabilities”, this could encompass legalizing the market for vulnerabilities, fostering security research and coordinated disclosure programs, software liability and legal incentives for security-by-design, mandated disclosure and information sharing, liability for data breaches (here I believe corporate law might provide new avenues for liability).

What are you most looking forward to about the RSA Conference?

Learning about the future challenges of the emerging cybersecurity landscape from fellow scholars and leading industry players.

 

Kurt Hepler

Kurt Hepler is a second-year student in the Master of Information Management and Systems program, where he focuses on cybersecurity and privacy issues. Before heading to Berkeley, Kurt helped spread computer science education to high schools around the world at CodeHS, an education technology startup based in San Francisco. A self-taught programmer, Kurt received degrees in political science and Russian language as an undergraduate at BYU.

Why did you apply to be an RSAC Scholar?

Cybersecurity is a broad and multidisciplinary field. As such, lasting solutions to cybersecurity problems also need to span many disciplines. Unfortunately, the many sides involved in finding and implementing solutions often don’t communicate effectively with one another.

I believe that these communication barriers can be overcome by meeting with and learning from others who are passionate about cybersecurity. The RSAC Security Scholars program is an excellent opportunity to connect with students from around the country who are exploring cybersecurity from a variety of perspectives.

What are your primary research interests?

I am interested in the intersection of social and technical challenges in cybersecurity. Recently, I’ve focused on improving security education and usability.

What do you think are some of the most important emerging areas in cybersecurity?

I think that the proliferation of automated and Internet-connected devices, from medical implants to self-driving cars, has profound implications for our future. These technologies blur the line between cybersecurity and physical security. There are a lot of important problems that are yet to be solved in this space.

What are you most looking forward to about the RSA Conference?

I’m excited to see the latest research and cutting-edge work and see how it can be applied in real-world settings.

 

Won Park

Won Park is a senior undergraduate studying Computer Science at UC Berkeley. He has been a cyber security intern at Sandia National Laboratories and presented “The Emerging Cyber-Physical Threat: A Data-Driven Analysis of Major Cyber-Physical Attacks from Around the World” at the 84th MORS Symposium, at Quantico. Currently, he works with Professor David Wagner on usable security. In the future, he hopes to enter graduate school and earn his PhD in security. In his free time, Won enjoys photography, sports, eating food, and playing games.

Why did you apply to be an RSAC Scholar?

I stumbled upon the world of computer security by chance, but I hadn’t looked back since. My previous experience doing research at Berkeley and at Sandia National Labs has exposed me to some areas, but I wanted to share ideas and hear from others about their perspectives on various problems and solutions.

What are your primary research interests?

My primary research interests lie in the area of usable security and privacy.

What do you think are some of the most important emerging areas in cybersecurity?

I think one of the most important emerging areas in cybersecurity are securing the cloud, machine learning, and IoT.

What are you most looking forward to about the RSA Conference?

I look forward to talking to industry leaders and researchers and hearing about what they believe are emerging threats to cybersecurity and the proposed solutions.